sources of magnesium include green, leafy vegetables, meats, starches, grains and nuts, and milk

Magnesium is sort of a super-nutrient; research actually classifies it as an essential dietary mineral (macromineral). It’s in our bones and muscles, it helps numerous processes within the body, and it’s found in countless food sources. Yet two out of every three people aren’t getting the recommended daily allowance.

Based on research from Japan, more of us should be standing up and taking notice. According to researchers from Japan’s National Cancer Center in Tokyo, increased intakes of magnesium may reduce a man’s risk of colon cancer by over 50 percent.

“During the course of the study, 689 and 440 cases of colorectal cancer in men and women were documented. Men with the highest average intakes of magnesium (at least 327 mg/d) were associated with a 52 per cent lower risk of [colon cancer], compared to men who consumed the lowest average intakes.”

So where do we find magnesium? Well, chances are you’re already consuming it in your current diet. Dietary sources of magnesium include green, leafy vegetables, meats, starches, grains and nuts, and milk. But, as stated earlier, we just don’t consume enough to get our RDAs.

Not to mention that cooking said food sources can greatly diminish the amount of magnesium in them. Spinach, for example, is a great source of magnesium. Just don’t blanch those leaves, or else you can lose up to one-third of the nutrient.

Read the original blog post.